TEMPERAMENT
        Boston is a gentle breed that typically has a strong, happy-go-lucky, and friendly personality with a merry sense of humour. Bostons are generally eager to please their owner and can be easily trained. They can be very protective of their owners, which may result in aggressive and territorial behavior toward other pets and strangers. The breed requires only a minimal amount of grooming.

        While originally bred for fighting as well as hunting rats in garment factories, they were later down bred for companionship. They are not considered terriers by the American Kennel Club, however, but are part of the non-sporting group.

        Both females and males are generally quiet and bark only when necessary, though early training in this regard is essential. Their usually sensible attitude towards barking makes them excellent choices for apartment dwellers. They enjoy being around people, get along well with children, the elderly, other canines, and non-canine pets, if properly socialized.

        HEALTH

        Curvature of the back, called roaching, might be caused by patella problems with the rear legs, which in turn causes the dog to lean forward onto the forelegs. This might also just be a structural fault with little consequence to the dog. Due to their shortened muzzles, many Boston Terriers cannot tolerate excessively hot or cold weather and demanding exercise under such conditions can cause them harm. A sensitive digestive system is also typical of Boston Terriers with flatulence commonly being associated with poor diet in the breed.

        Their large and prominent eyes make Boston Terriers prone to corneal ulcers. Due to the breed being characterized by a short muzzle paired with a large pair of eyes, their eyes are susceptible to injury when making contact with sand, dust, debris, or sharp objects, such as plants with thorns.

        Bostons are brachycephalic breeds. The word comes from Greek roots “Brachy,” meaning short and “cephalic,” meaning head. This anatomy can cause tiny nostrils, long palates and a narrow trachea. Boston’s may be prone to snoring and reverse sneeze—a rapid and repeated forced inhalation through the nose—accompanied by snorting or gagging sounds used to clear the palate of mucus, which does not harm the dog in any way. Brachycephalic dogs may be prone to complications with general anesthesia. Boston’s frequently require caesarean section to give birth, with over 80% of litters in a UK Kennel Club survey delivered this way.

        HISTORY

        The Boston terrier breed originated around 1875, when Robert C. Hopper of Boston, purchased from Edward Burnett a dog named Judge (known later as Hooper’s Judge), which was of a bull and terrier type lineage. Hooper’s Judge is directly related to the original bull and terrier breeds of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The American Kennel Club cites Hooper’s Judge as the ancestor of all true modern Boston Terriers.

        Judge weighed about 32 pounds (15 kg). Judge was bred to Burnett’s Gyp (or Kate). Gyp was a white bulldog-type female, owned by Mr. Edward Burnett, of Southboro, MA. She weighed about 20 pounds, was stocky and strong and had the typical blocky head now shown in Bostons. From this foundation of the breed, subsequent breeders refined the breed into what we know of it today. [10] Bred down in size from fighting dogs of the bull and terrier types, the Boston Terrier originally weighed up to 44 pounds (20 kg) (Old Boston Bulldogs). The breed was first shown in Boston in 1870. By 1889 the breed had become sufficiently popular in Boston that fanciers formed the American Bull Terrier Club, the breed’s nickname, “roundheads”. Shortly after, at the suggestion of James Watson (a noted writer and authority), the club changed its name to the Boston Terrier Club and in 1893 it was admitted to membership in the American Kennel Club, thus making it the first US breed to be recognized. It is one of a small number of breeds to have originated in the United States. The Boston Terrier was the first non-sporting dog breed in the US.

        In the early years, the color and markings were not very important. By the 20th century the breed’s distinctive markings and color were written into the standard, becoming an essential feature. The Boston Terrier has lost most of its aggressive nature, preferring the company of humans, although some males will still challenge other dogs if they feel their territory is being invaded. Boston University’s mascot is Rhett the Boston Terrier. The Boston Terrier is also the mascot of Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C.